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From Inside Higher Ed, a little recruiting news: Verbal Commitments Challenged

A proposal to prohibit early verbal scholarship offers — a controversial practice that permeates football and men’s basketball — is among the major pieces of legislation on the docket for next week’s National Collegiate Athletic Association convention in San Antonio.

The NCAA convention takes place annually and gathers officials from institutions and conferences in all three of the association’s divisions. It is the culmination of the association’s yearly legislative cycle, and it is where some — though not all — of its rules for players and institutions are decided by its membership.

No surprise, Report shows DII athletics in line with institutional spending

In the first Division II revenues and expenses report compiled since 2004, athletics expenses at schools with football programs represented less than 6 percent of the institutional budget and 5 percent for schools without football.

The data also show that it costs less than half as much to operate a football program at the Division II level as it would in the Division I Football Championship Subdivision. The median expense for Division II schools with football is a little less than $4 million, while that figure is about $8.6 million for FCS programs. The operating cost is about $10.1 million for programs in the Division I Football Bowl Subdivision.

And more “no surprise,” DIII report shows alignment between athletics and institutional spending

Data from the most recent Division III revenues and expenses report show that the division is doing a good job of funding athletics participation opportunities without overly taxing institutional budgets.

The first report on athletics spending in Division III since 2002 shows that for schools offering football, athletics spending as a proportion of total institutional spending has moved only slightly – from 3.5 percent in 2005 to just over 4 percent in 2009. And for the non-football schools, athletics spending stayed fairly flat, between 2 and 2.5 percent of total spending.

Those percentages are significant, given that student-athletes compose roughly 30 percent of total enrollment in most Division III schools.

I wonder if the Sports Economists will weigh in.

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in the land o’ Badgers: Wisconsin seeks new athletics facility

Wisconsin athletic officials are asking for a $76.8 million athletic performance center in the next two-year state budget, five years after a $109.5-million expansion of Camp Randall Stadium.

The University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents will review the request Thursday.

The proposal includes a new multistory building used primarily for football with new locker rooms and weight training facilities for all athletes.

Guess they don’t care much about this article out of the NCAA: Latest revenues and expense data reveal effects of slumping economy

Data from the most recent report of athletics revenue and expenses at Division I institutions are starting to reflect the effects that a slumping economy has inflicted on all of higher education.

Data collected from the 2008-09 report compiled by Transylvania University faculty member Dan Fulks, which include the early stages of the recession, reveal more of a burden on institutional allocations to balance athletics budgets. Just 14 programs from the Football Bowl Subdivision generated revenues over expenses, compared with 25 such programs in 2006-07 and 2007-08.

In addition, the median institutional allocation for athletics (total expenses minus revenue directly generated by the athletics department) at the FBS level rose from about $8 million in 2007-08 to $10.2 million in 2008-09. That means FBS institutions are committing more dollars to maintain their athletics program.

I’m waiting for the Sports Economist blog to weigh in.

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