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this sounds like a hot “denial of transfer” mess (with echoes of a more recent fiasco): Full timeline of Daisha Simmons’ request to transfer from Alabama to Seton Hall

From Asbury Park Press: Alabama called “spiteful” in block of Simmons transfer

Although they may threaten and delay and even impose conditions, college sports teams rarely block someone from transferring to play elsewhere.

Rarer still — virtually unheard of — is a college blocking a transfer who already has a degree.

The case of Daisha Simmons, then, is like Halley’s comet.

More from Swish Appeal: The sad story of Daisha Simmons’ fight to transfer from Alabama to Seton Hall

As reported by multiple outlets during the NCAA offseason, Alabama has taken a hard-line stance in blocking senior Daisha Simmons from transferring to Seton Hall for family reasons. ESPN college basketball analyst Jay Bilas said in an interview with Swish Appeal that the NCAA has done the right thing in response to the blocked transfer request, but Alabama is “acting in a shameful fashion”.

In happier news: Dolson Gives Her Take on the U.S. Women’s National Team

First off, my time with U.S. Women’s National Team was a great experience. It was an honor just to be selected for training camp and then to make it past the first cut and to go with the team to France is something I am very proud of. I came in with confidence and I think that helped me throughout camp and ultimately helped me be in the final 15.

One of the biggest takeaways for me was that I was honored to be around women like Diana Taurasi, Maya Moore and Seimone Augustus (among others). It truly was great to see how they carried themselves. I saw how hard they went in practice. I saw how motivated they were to do everything perfect — even down to streching. I even saw how they handled themselves off the court. When we were not practicing and there was some down time, nobody had headphones on or was in their own world. Everybody was talking and professional. I respected that. It was a learning opportunity for myself and it’s something I can use to my advantage in the future.

The Times-Picayune catches up with Pokey Chatman of Ama, still shining with Women’s National Basketball Association

A little “better late than never” from espnW: HEY FIBA, LET QATARI WOMEN PLAY

The best argument you can make against sports boycotts is that those who show up usually make history. Not those who stay away.

Think of Jesse Owens at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. Think of John Carlos and Tommie Smith’s Black Power salute at the 1968 Mexico City Games or baseball’s Jackie Robinson. Think of Kathrine Switzer sprinting to elude the race official who was trying to stop her from competing in the 1967 Boston Marathon or Venus Williams taking the microphone after winning the 2009 Dubai Tennis Championships and lamenting the absence of Shahar Pe’er, the Israeli woman who was banned by organizers and denied a visa to enter the Arabic country.

But sometimes refusing to play can actually be the right thing to do.

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with BG on the bench and EDD moving better, they had a chance to make the Merc sing this:

Instead, a total team effort — and some classic DT — has Phoenix singing this:

It’s lovely knowing that pro women’s basketball ain’t over and, selfishly, I’m hoping that Elena is healthy enough (and fortunate enough) to be named to the USA National Team. I want to see her on the same side as BG in Turkey. ’cause then, they can all sing:

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fingers crossed.… feast your eyes on the USA Basketball Showcase which is set to tip-ff at 7 pm tonight on ESPN2

Geno Auriemma’s second term as USA Basketball’s senior national team coach presents unique challenges.

Auriemma, holder of nine national champions at UConn since 1995, will be expected to defend the 2010 world championship and prepare for the defense of 2012 Olympic gold while subtlety turning over the roster that accomplished it.

He will do so with the plan of passing along the new foundation to the next national coach, who he assures absolutely will not be him.

From the Courant: Geno Auriemma, U.S. Women’s National Team On Display Tonight

From SportzEdge: One on one with Geno: Auriemma talks Team USA practice

U.S. Women’s Basketball: Discovering What It Means To Represent Team USA

 For the last few days, members of the USA Basketball Women’s National Team could not help but be reminded of what it means to represent Team USA.

Not only have they been wearing their Team USA gear and practicing together in preparation for the upcoming FIBA World Championship in Turkey, but also they have been training at the U.S. Naval Academy, dining with midshipmen and meeting with high-ranking military members. Everywhere you go in the Maryland capital city of Annapolis, there are storefronts with the American flag and people walking around in military uniforms.

*I had a little flashback to an ’07 trip to Trenton to catch the USA v. Australia game. Bunch of us went, the hunted down a nearby sports bar to catch the Detroit/Phoenix finals. It was a Sunday, so we had to convince them to turn on the game... And what a game it was. Gained the league some fans that day…*

From Dishin & Swishin 09/11/14 Podcast: Talking WNBA Finals and USA Basketball tryouts with AP’s Doug Feinberg

BTW – Speaking of 2007: The WNBA Finals 2014 Game 2 – a 97-68 win for the Phoenix Mercury over the Chicago Sky – delivered a 0.6 overnight rating, marking the highest overnight number for any WNBA postseason game on ESPN or ESPN2 since 2007. Anyone still b*tching about the “Three to See” marketing?

Nate has The Daily Swish: USABWNT Showcase, Finals ratings

Check out the All-WNBA teams.

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is she ignores all those who’ve ever told her “put an arc in it!” ’cause dang, it’s a flat, FAST shot. And when it goes in (as it did last night) it just makes you shake your head and say, “geometry, as we know it, has been temporarily suspended.” Most of the Minny folks did well as the Storm said “Hi” to Lauren and wished she’d been on the court.

Speaking of the Lynx, Nate asks: 2012 WNBA Point Guard Rankings: How Good Has The Lynx All-Time Assist Leader Been This Season?

Yes, d’em Shock are feisty. But sometimes you live by the Latta, you die by the Latta (say the Sun, muttering under their breath.). Especially if you have a Lawson.

That being said, folks in the Drive for the Dive must be wondering, “How much longer before Cambage suits up and what kind of impact will she have?” ’cause it would seem the Lib are more than willing to stagger through the door the Sky have opened.

When will the LA writers notice the Sparks? Indy sure did. That’s seven straight for the palm tree wearers.

Jayda offers up her WNBA power rankings, and they’re more silver than gold.

There’s a little wacko USA BBall going on: U.S. fields teams in FIBA 3-on-3 hoops World Championship

Oh, and the “still wet behind the ears” crew is doing all right: USA U17 Women Cruise Into Quarterfinals With 98-28 Rout Of Mali.

“They are undefeated in pool play, and I’m proud of them,” Schneider said of her team. “Obviously, now we are to a point where you lose and you are out of contention for a gold medal. We want to be sure we are approaching the bracket play in the right frame of mind, and I think that we are. I think that they are ready, and they are obviously very talented. Now, we are just waiting to see who it is going to be.”

They’ll celebrate my birthday by going up against Australia in the semis. (Wow. Just got a hit of deja vu!)

Speaking of Aussies: Olympic hero returns

She left Australia as a rising star but Rachel Jarry has returned a hero.

The Point Cook resident arrived back on home-soil last week with the rest of her Opals team-mates and her prized bronze medal hanging proudly around her neck.

Speaking of the Olympics: From the DePaul site: Bruno’s Olympic Trilogy—Part One: Road to the Gold: Three-Part Series Opens With DePaul Coach Retracing Steps to USA’s Fifth Gold Medal

And, I’m sorry, but WTF is ESPN doing wasting money on having someone like Kate Fagan write about the WNBA? (Roster limits hurt WNBA). It’s obvious that she doesn’t care about the league, so much so that she can’t even be bothered to learn about the personnel (hello, you want someone Lin-esque with actual talent? How about Becky Hammon). Then she throws together a piece that’s totally ill-informed, self-contradictory with a good does of “illogical” thrown in for good measure.

Hey, the League faces plenty of challenges — it would be nice if someone who actually was interested in doing their job with a modicum of integrity was asked to write about those challenges.

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more US women participating in the Olympics than the men (still waiting for the anti-Title IXers to start whining about that being unfair.) I liked Taurasi’s deadpan reaction to the information: “Shocked. Shocked. How’d they let that happen?”

Like many women (and male) Olympians, she is not immune to the sexism of the IOC and FIBA (I do not envy Val Ackerman’s gig, but I admire her for fighting, fighting, fighting.)

And, of course, we’ve been following the other news thread: Olympians complain of gender discrimination

The women’s team was assigned seats in premium economy for the 13-hour flight to Paris while the nation’s under-23 men’s team was up front on the same flight.

“It should have been the other way around,” 2011 FIFA women’s world player of the year Homare Sawa told Japanese media after arriving in the French capital. “Even just in terms of age we are senior.”

Basketball Australia says it will review its travel policy for national teams after complaints that the men flew business class to the Olympics while most of the women sat in premium economy. The women’s team is by far the most successful of the two, having won silver medals at the last three Olympics. The men, who will be led in London by San Antonio Spurs point guard Patty Mills, have never won an Olympic medal.

Back to US athletes: for me, the big questions will center around coverage: how will the number of stories published on US women athletes compare to those published on US men athletes? If I were a betting woman, I’d guess there’ll a significant discrepancy, say 65% men to 35% women? What’s your guess?

Of course, no matter how many lines of text are used, it will be equally important to look at the language used. Consider this from Feministing.com: Olympic sexism study: Male athletes have skill and female athletes have luck

According to a new study on past television coverage of the Olympics, sports commentators talk about athletes in notably different ways depending on their gender. And by “notably different” I mean “pretty sexist.” The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Delaware, analyzed NBC’s primetime coverage of past games. The main findings:

  • When female athletes succeed, commentators tend to focus on luck and less on physical ability.
  • When female athletes fail, physical ability and commitment are noted.
  • When male athletes succeed, commentators applaud their skill and commitment to the sport.
  • When male athletes fail, it is not necessarily about their failure, but about how their competitors succeeded.

Adding more info to the overall conversation, and with a huge h/t to sue:

The Curley Center for Sports Journalism has published an interesting study on why more women don’t watch women’s sports. Key findings:

In drawing from the conversations, we suggest that fanship is something more than simply developing an affinity for a certain team, but rather a complex concept mediated by one’s gender roles. For example, most of the women expressed a preference for the Olympics (an especially timely finding and one that sparked the initial popular interest in the piece). Indeed, analysts are saying that the female audience watching the Olympics will be larger than ever. Our research helps explain why this is; we note that the way the Olympics are presented – in short, easy-to-digest packages – are especially easy to appreciate for individuals who do not have the luxury of sitting down in front of the television for three uninterrupted hours. Rather, for those who are responsible for childcare and other domestic labor duties (generally women, according to existing wide-scale sociological research), the routine of sitting down only to get back up quickly to tend to something in the house is all too familiar. Thus, the ability to turn on the TV for 15 minutes, see a nice, tidy package of, say, track and field, is especially conducive for people with a hectic and full schedule in the home…….

The challenge to building a women’s sports fan base is also mediated by the form of domestic life. As the women in this study showed, watching sports was not a leisure activity, but rather associated with emotion labor. On the latter part of this two-pronged challenge, media producers and women’s sports advocates interested in building audiences in the short-term need to acknowledge and address the structural impediments facing women with the potential for interest in watching women play. For instance, airing professional women’s sports on weekends is a barrier for many women who perform traditional gender roles associated with childcare.

You’ll remember the numbers on “traditional gender roles:”

The number of hours men and women commit to housework has remained roughly the same over the last several years, according to a new American Time Use Survey from the Bureau of Labor Statics. This, even while women continue to take on a bigger role in the workforce. Let’s look at the numbers:

In 2011, 83% of women and 65% of men “spent some time doing household activities such as housework, cooking, lawn care or financial and other household management,” according to the report (which you can find here). The year earlier, the spread was 84% to 67%, respectively. Flash back to 2003 and the numbers were at 84% and 63%. So, sure, we’re seeing some change but none that I’d classify as particularly profound — especially when you look at how the workforce is divided today.

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In Santiago, the USA U19 Women’s stingy defense generated a dominating 90-64 win over Italy.

“I was really happy with our intensity and our focus,” said Jennifer Rizzotti, USA U19 World Championship Team and University of Hartford head coach. “We talked a lot today about not just thinking about who we’re playing, but being more accountable on the defensive end for our own guy and playing screens better, just being more focused and getting better as the game went on. Not only did our starters do a nice job, I thought our energy off the bench was the best it’s been the whole tournament.”

More quotes here and FIBA links here.

STREAMING ALERT: FIBATV (www.FIBATV.com will be streaming live online the semifinal and medal games on July 30 and July 31. Additionally, live radio streaming from the USA’s games can be found here: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/fibau19women

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Squeak!

The U-19 was severely tested by China, who roared back from a 13-pt deficit only to fall short of pulling off a major upset. Said coach Rizzotti of the 80-77 squeaker:

“I think our team needs to really remember what we’re here for, take it seriously and get themselves ready to go and understand that we’re going to get everybody’s best shot.”

“I want to give China a lot of credit for the way they played,” she added.

“They did such a great job of using screens, reading screens. Once they’re hot they make sure to go back to the same player.

“This result will bolster their confidence and make them feel better about how they’re playing.

More quotes here.

Q: In the last few minutes, Bria Hartley and Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis were hitting shots. Does that show their poise and calm?

Rizzotti: I still continue to be amazed at Bria Hartley’s guts and her willingness to take the big shot, make the big play. Then on the other side of the ball, turn around and guard the other team’s best player. Obviously it was nice to have Kaleena show up today and knock down some shots for us. It’s just probably a little more disappointing that our post players were so bad around the basket. I feel like it never would have been a close game if we hit those 10 or 12 layups we missed in the first half. They have to understand the urgency of every possession and playing every possession like it’s the most important and that missing a layup is just not going to be good enough. We can’t continue to do that if we want to advance in this tournament.

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