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(Doing a little catch up) From the Title IX blog: Alma College wrestling reborn

We’ve largely gotten away from correcting all the little mistakes, misinterpretations, and misrepresentations of Title IX that occur in the media. But sometimes one of them just strikes that nerve and…

A story about the rebirth of intercollegiate wrestling at Alma College in Michigan says that the program was cut in 1984 “in large part because of Title IX.” This bothers me for two–related–reasons. One, a majority of the wrestling community blames the enforcement of Title IX for its demise in the 80s. And two, Title IX was not being applied to athletic departments in 1984. The Grove City decision came down in 1984. No school is going to cut a program for Title IX reasons while a Supreme Court decision over whether it will have to or not is pending.

Erin does some interesting analysis in her post: How Diverse Are Women’s College Sports?

 Recently, the NCAA published the most recent school-year’s participation data, which includes breakdowns by sex, race, sport, division, and conference. Because this data set goes back to the 1999-2000 school year, I decided to use it to look for trends in racial diversity in women’s college athletics over the last decade. Several hours and few Excel spreadsheets later, I have the some questions and answers to report.
You can also hear Erin on NPR’s Marketplace discussing Title IX & Bullying: Legal Doors Closed, But Prince Case Continues to Impact
The settlement details of a lawsuit  between the parents of Phoebe Prince, a 15 year old student who committed suicide in January 2010, and the town of South Hadley and its school department were revealed this week.  A legal door may  now be closed for the parties involved, but legal analysts say the Prince case remains a cautionary tale.
Also from the site, and interesting action in light of the Penn State/Sandusky case: UNI Undertakes Title IX Compliance Review
The University of Northern Iowa is undertaking a comprehensive Title IX compliance review, officials announced this week. UNI reportedly has hired an outside firm to examine “‘all policies and procedures that funnel into Title IX’ including student misconduct, harassment and discrimination, communication, outreach and training.” This kind of review is the first of its kind at UNI, which has in the past conducted a narrow review of its sexual misconduct policy but never one as broad as has been described. It also sets UNI apart from its peers, as this this article suggests, by undertaking a review that is broader than sexual abuse reporting policies as other public Iowa universities have done in the wake of the Penn State scandal.
The review will undoubtedly examine the university’s response to a 2004 incident in which a female student was assaulted in her dorm room by two UNI football players. In 2007, the student sued the university, arguing that the university’s hostile and indifferent response constituted a violation of Title IX. She argued that university officials treated her with “great animosity,” denied her academic accommodations and a request to change dormitories, and failed to respond to reports that she was receiving harassing calls from players. After she was forced to quit school, the university sent her tuition bill to a collection agency and the dean of students told her she was disappointed “she didn’t tough it out.” All of this, if proven true, sounds like a classic case for institutional liability under Title IX.

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