Feeds:
Posts

Archive for October, 2014

Thanks for sharing WBB History

Got a lovely email, which led to this delightful discovery:  Clarissa Atkinson blog post about the old “girls’ rules” for women’s basketball – entitled “Crossing the Center Line: Girls’ Rules to Girls Rule.”

The author, in her varsity uniform, circa 1950

Back around the middle of the twentieth century, when I played high school basketball, we were not allowed to cross the center line. There were six girls on a team, three forwards and three guards, all rooted in their own half of the court. Guards never took a shot – they couldn’t. They struggled to get the ball from the opposing forwards, then threw it across the line to their own forwards, who got the glory, what there was of it. We were not allowed to dribble – one bounce, that’s all you got – and there was no such thing as a point guard. I went to a small girls’ school with a tradition of (relatively) serious attention to sports: our basketball rivalry with a neighboring school dated all the way back to 1901. But we played by girls’ rules, of course; nobody crossed the center line until 1971, just before Title IX, when all the rules changed.

I’ve often thought that “Crossing the Center Line” would be a fine title for a memoir for someone who came of age in the 1950s and lived through second-wave feminism in the 70s. In adolescence and beyond, we lived by girls’ rules. Like most people in those days, born too soon for the “Question Authority”t-shirt, we pretty much accepted the rules that were handed down.

Gives me a chance to relate a conversation I had with my mom a while back. She turned 81 last July, and was/is a beautiful athlete. Field Hockey, softball, tennis… whatever she laid her hand to, she was good at. (Long-time readers this blog may remember that her mom and her aunt (Louise and Nancy Van Voorhees) were part of a group of women who traveled to the Aug. 20, 1922, competition at Pershing Stadium in Paris: The first international track meet for women.)

Anyhow, as I started putting together my basketball timeline back in 2004 and began learning about the history of women’s athletics, I remember asking mom about what kind of sports she played in college (she studied voice at Vassar). What she described were the “Play Days” that were inserted in many colleges to replace intercollegiate competitions. Women within (or without) the schools would gather and form teams. If one team seemed to be wining too much, it was disbanded and new teams were formed. Said my mom, “I remember feeling vaguely disappointed that we didn’t have varsity sports.”

Like Ms. Atkinson, mom accepted the rules as they were. Luckily, in other areas, she has not — and I’m the better for it.

Read Full Post »

Aetna And Travelers Go Back In Time To Play Women’s Basketball Game

Travelers had a successful team — the “Tower Five” — first, starting in 1921. The 1921-22 team went 20-2 and outscored its opponents, 469-180. According to Bermel, the people from Travelers encouraged Aetna to start a team in 1923. Adrian Brennan, who worked at Aetna, was the coach.

Over the next decade, the Aetna girls — the “Crimson Tide,” who were also known as the “hotsy-totsy girls from Hartford” in the New York press — won 111 of 133 games. They played in (and won) the first women’s basketball game at Madison Square Garden in 1928. Dr. James Naismith traveled from Springfield to watch them play.

Glad to see this. I uncovered some of the Aetna photos on their website back in the day when I put together the (now out of date) women’s basketball timeline, but they disappeared. Even reached out to Aetna – confusing the heck out of some folks – but to no avail.

In the Bayou, LSU women’s basketball striving to cultivate new leaders

Last year, seniors Jeanne Kenney, Shanece McKinney and Theresa Plaisance led the LSU women’s basketball team on both ends of the floor.

Coming into this season, the Lady Tigers are looking for ways to replace the production of these players by adapting to a style of play that fits the current roster and their leadership.

From the Big 12: 

Each of the last two seasons, Sherri Coale’s challenge was finding enough healthy players to practice. Two years ago, Coale had to borrow two players from the volleyball team.

This season, the Sooners have a full 15-player roster.

“I love the fact that my gym is crowded and I want it to stay crowded,” Coale said Thursday during the Big 12 Women’s Basketball Tour visit. “We have a lot of options. The question is who will be our starting five. I have no idea and that’s a fantastic problem to have.”

Nearby at Oklahoma State

Point Guard University has a new player ready to continue the tradition.

Andrea Riley, who was the Big 12’s career scoring leader before behind dethroned by Brittney Griner, started Oklahoma State’s run of outstanding guards in 2006.

Tiffany Bias then took over and helped the Cowgirls with an all-around game that last season produced 13.9 points, 6.2 assists, 3.1 rebounds and 2.1 assists per game. Her career ended with Oklahoma State’s loss to Notre Dame in the Sweet 16.

Next up? Sophomore Roshunda Johnson.

Speaking of the Big 12: Cindy Brunson provides an in-depth 2014-15 preview

Speaking of the other 12, from Sue: Pac-12 preview: Stanford University

The biggest mystery in the Pac-12 going into the season is what Stanford will look like this year. Conference coaches picked the Cardinal to win the conference again, but the fact is that no one will know for sure until they step on to the court.

For starters, Stanford is Ogwumike-less for the first time in six years, with the graduation of Chiney Ogwumike last spring. Not only did the sisters lead the team statistically, but they carried it and kept the Cardinal relevant for the past three seasons.

From Connecticut: UHart women’s basketball adds 6 year old team member

The University of Hartford’s Women’s basketball team has a new team member that will never see a minute of action, but the impact she will make is immeasurable. Six year old Zoe Brown, who suffers from a rare immune system disease Opsoclonus Myoclonus Syndrome, is the newest Hawk, thanks to the program Team Impact that pairs youth with life threatening illnesses with college and pro sports teams.

Well, this is unpleasant: Army used alcohol-fueled party, cheerleaders to woo recruits

The Colorado Springs Gazette reported Saturday that U.S. Military Academy documents show that the Army football program wooed recruits with an alcohol-fueled bus party, small amounts of booster cash, and dates with cheerleaders and female athletes.

Per the Gazette, the academy “acknowledged the misconduct” and admitted 20 cadets had been disciplined with two officers and two Army coaches facing reprimands. The academy also self-reported a recruiting violation to the NCAA.

Speaking of unpleasant. From EDD: No One Should Have to Go Through the Bullying That I Did

No one should ever experience being bullied. It’s a cowardly action that unfortunately occurs all too often in our schools. According to the National Education Association, it is estimated that 160,000 children miss school every day due to fear of attack or intimidation by other students. I was one of those students being bullied. I would hear constant comments and snickers from students about my height. “Hey, you are taller than my dad and all dads! You are taller than the rest. Why are you so tall? Why aren’t you normal?” Those comments bothered me, made me feel small — made me wonder why I was different than everyone else. Why I was the one being picked on.

Read Full Post »

unless, of course, I can’t get out of the bloody office…

The U.S. women play Mexico in the CONCACAF semifinals at 7:30 p.m. ET Friday. From Graham: MIDFIELDERS HOLIDAY, LLOYD AND RAPINOE ARE THE KEY TO USWNT SUCCESS

As much as it brings on shuddering memories of ninth grade geometry lessons, any soccer field is as much an homage to Euclid as Pele or Mia Hamm. One large rectangle to begin with, the field is further subdivided into smaller and smaller rectangles — a 6-yard box within an 18-yard box that rests within each half of the field. The goal frame adds its element of perpendicularity. A circle, with its painted diameter right out of a textbook, sits in the middle of the field.

And if the United States is to end a World Cup drought that stretches back more than 15 years to a sun-drenched day in the Rose Bowl, the triangle might be the shape that matters most. Its lines invisible as it shifts, sometimes obtuse, other times acute, it is the product of points occupied by Lauren Holiday, Carli Lloyd and Megan Rapinoe.

It might not be a right triangle, but it needs to be the correct one next summer.

Read Full Post »

The Irish are smiling: Notre Dame popular pick at ACC women’s basketball media day

Notre Dame didn’t lose a conference game in its first season in the ACC, and if prognosticators at the conference women’s basketball media day are right, there aren’t going to be many losses this time, either.

For the first time in about six seasons, Duke won’t be picked by many to play in the Final Four in women’s basketball.

And while veteran coach Joanne P. McCallie says she would rather be the ACC’s “top dog,” coaching a team that’s not under such pressure should be a lot of fun.

Duke had its annual preseason media day on Wednesday next to Cameron Indoor Stadium, and the most striking thing about it was the dearth of familiar faces.

When it comes to her team this year, four things stand out to Sylvia Hatchell.“We have leadership, we’ve got experience, we’ve got depth, and great chemistry,” the Hall of Fame coach told reporters Wednesday morning at ACC Women’s Basketball Media Day in Greensboro.

Three Pac-12 women’s basketball teams earned first-place votes in the preseason coaches’ poll, but despite some major changes upcoming, the Stanford Cardinal was voted the favorite for the 15th year in a row.
They won’t have to face 6’9″ Golden Bear: Savanna Trapp Out Indefinitely

Cynthia Cooper-Dyke’s players seem to have an unparalled work ethic. During 2014-15 Pac-12 Women’s Basketball Media Day on Wednesday, what the USC Trojans head coach said of forward Alexyz Vaioletama’s summer made you believe it.

“I was mad at Alexyz,” Cooper said, half-joking. “She worked too hard over the summer.”

 Never let it be said that Cynthia Cooper-Dyke doesn’t know how to make an entrance into a room.

USC’s women’s basketball coach is by nature a noisemaker.

She entered the interview room at the Pac-12 headquarters Wednesday prepared to talk to the media about her Women of Troy and their preparations to start a new season and build on last season’s first NCAA tournament appearance since 2006.

But first, Cooper-Dyke had to take a selfie with senior forward Alexyz Vaioletama, trying to line up the media in the background for a group photo-bomb. At another point, she offered to sing a little something.

The other USC has huge expectations: South Carolina picked to repeat as Southeastern Conference women’s basketball champions

South Carolina coach Dawn Staley knows the work it took to reach the top of the Southeastern Conference. She understands it’ll be an even greater challenge for the defending SEC champs to stay there.

Gone are the days when everyone would pencil in Tennessee to dominate the SEC, win the league title and easily move on to the Final Four. While the Gamecocks were picked to repeat, Staley expects the defending champions to be challenged by a hungry, talented group of teams looking to finish on top.

Meh: Veteran Lady Vols shrug off No. 2 prediction

On a day promoting a big-picture view of women’s basketball, Isabelle Harrison set her sights on the finer details.

“We want to set goals for ourselves,” Tennessee’s senior center said. “We want to keep it small right now, little things that are going to add up in the end.”

Delle (Dunkin’) Donne might be gone, but that doesn’t mean the Blue Hens are down and out: Delaware Women’s Basketball Predicted to Finish Second in CAA.
They’ll have to get through the Dukes, though, if they want to get to the Dance, ’cause James Madison is Voted to Repeat as CAA Women’s Basketball Champions
Even without 6’9″ Craig, the Great Danes are still thought to be the top dog in the America East — but lookee at the #2 Seawolves!

In the Big West, CSUN is the Overwhelming Favorite For Women’s Hoops Crown

After sweeping last season’s regular season and Tournament titles, CSUN is the media favorite to take home the crown in the 2014-15 season. The Matadors gained 13 first place votes and 125 points overall for the first place nod. Hawai’i checked in behind the defending champions with 101 points and the remaining first place vote. Back-to-back Tournament finalist Cal Poly was third with 99 points, while UC Davis wrapped up the top half of the poll with 83 points for fourth place.

In the New Big East, DePaul is the top Demon.

So fun the first time, they’re looking to do it a second: North Dakota Picked First In Preseason Women’s Basketball Poll

North Dakota won its first Big Sky championship and earned its first berth in the NCAA Women’s Basketball Tournament as a Division I school last season. The Green and White posted a 22-10 mark last season with a 15-5 record in the Big Sky. North Dakota earned the most points in both polls, pulling 115 points and seven first-place votes in the coaches’ poll while earning 147 points and eight-first place votes from the media. 

From the Green Wave: Tulane women’s basketball coach Lisa Stockton: ‘We want the NCAA Tournament

Tulane women’s basketball coach Lisa Stockton said expectations are high for a team that has won 20 games or more in five consecutive seasons.

And expectations should be high, especially considering Stockton returns 11 of 13 letter winners from a season ago and 97.9 percent of the team’s points and 98.7 percent of the team’s rebounds.

For the Terps, it looks like the top in the 10: Maryland women’s basketball favored to win Big Ten, which is a bit of A homecoming for Brenda Frese

 …the Terrapins’ debut season in the Big Ten is a homecoming of sorts for Frese, 44, who grew up in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

“I know for me personally, being able to come back in the Big Ten, having grown up in Iowa and (knowing) the Big Ten Conference extremely well, having coached at Minnesota for a season, I can’t wait,” she said. “I can’t wait to be able to get back and play against the great competition.”

This is interesting, considering the hot water UNC is in (UNC report finds 18 years of academic fraud to keep athletes playing): Tying college coaches’ contracts to academic progress gets mixed reviews

A proposed policy that would require teams to reach academic benchmarks before their coaches and athletic directors can cash in on performance-based bonuses has drawn mixed reviews.

The University System of Maryland’s Board of Regents is expected to vote on the policy Friday during a meeting at Frostburg State. If passed, any new contracts signed by coaches and athletic directors at the system’s schools would include stipulations that require teams to meet a certain Academic Progress Rate for them to receive bonuses based on other incentive clauses in their contracts.

If you’ve followed the “your students do well or else you lose your job” policies in education, you’ll have read about the cheating scandals. So – does this push folks (should I put “Top 25 folks”?) to focus on academics or focus on finding a way around academics?

Is it too early to say “on the hot seat”? Badgers women’s basketball: Coach Bobbie Kelsey excited entering 4th season

Where others might see pressure, Bobbie Kelsey sees opportunity.

Kelsey, beginning her fourth season as the University of Wisconsin women’s basketball coach, is still in search of her first winning season and first postseason tournament bid.

And yah, it’s too early, but the rest of the b-ball world has already warmed his seat.. so Ex-ESPN analyst Dykes defends his hire at Arkansas

“I’ve never been a head coach, never pulled the trigger on the sidelines making the decisions with live ammo flying around us,” Dykes said. “But I’ve seen it, and I’ve been a teacher on the air. I’ve tried to teach the game of basketball. I think that’s why I rose up in the profession like I did as an analyst, because I think I was a pretty good communicator and teacher on my nightly broadcast.”

In Colorado, so far, so good:

Two weeks into preseason practice is far from a make-or-break point in any team’s season, but it does provide enough time for a coach to start getting a feel for her team. According to Colorado women’s basketball head coach Linda Lappe, what her team has showed thus far is encouraging.

What do you think?

“We get better every day and we’re progressing on a great path,” Lappe said after practice last Friday. “I’ve been really impressed by our freshmen and how they’ve been able to come in and learn the system, but also our veterans and how they’re leading.”

Oh, oh: Mosqueda-Lewis Working Hard To Prove Skeptics Wrong

…if the draft were held today it is likely the Seattle Storm, which owns the pick, would take her and team her with Sue Bird, the first overall pick of the 2002 draft. 

But there is work to be done. There are WNBA executives who doubt Mosqueda-Lewis has the speed and agility to get to the basket, to create her own shots and, more importantly, guard the swift perimeter players she will be assigned to at the next level.

“People tend to make a lot of general assumptions,” Mosqueda-Lewis said. “I was probably the skinniest I’d ever been during my freshman year, but we didn’t win and I didn’t have my best season. 

Rebecca Lobo and Kevin Conners discuss the possibility of a 3-peat.

From Dishin & Swishin 10/23/14 Video & Podcast: Geno Auriemma on USA Basketball & coming back to UConn, Carol Callan on all things USA Basketball

NCAA regional tix are up for sale (PROMO CODE: NCAA ) Women’s Preliminary Round Tickets

What, too soon? What people are saying about some of the top 2015 WNBA Draft prospects

Shoni still doin’ the other thing she does so well:Local youth at Montana basketball clinic and  WNBA Shoni Schimmel visits Wagner School

It started in complete silence, and then slowly turned into a low rumble of anticipation and excitement. A highlight was being played on the big screen of the theater of Shoni Schimmel during one of her games as a professional Native American basketball player for the Atlanta Dream team.

Some say you should never meet your heroes because they never turn out to be who you think they are, but Schimmel has remained true to herself and to the people. She earned her bachelor’s degree in communications at Louisville, but she doesn’t just communicate with the people she meets, she connects.

From Swish Appeal: Eurobits: Meesseman, Montgomery off to Russia

WNBA players aren’t the only ones who go abroad: WNBA Coach of the Year Sandy Brondello to coach UMMC Yekaterinburg

OOOOO, History Alert! The Lancaster High School girls’ basketball team, 1919-1920

Ummm…we’ll do better next time: Sporting goods stores vow to get women in the game

When 12-year-old McKenna Peterson opened her new Dick’s Sporting Goods basketball catalog recently, the basketball player and superfan was frustrated to find a glaring misstep: The only girl in the catalog’s pages wasn’t playing basketball — she was sitting in the stands.

So McKenna began to type the company a fiery letter, not just praising her favorite female “dunking machines” but also tearing into the annoying imbalance the boy-heavy mailer seemed to represent. “It’s hard enough for girls to break through in this sport as it is,” she wrote, “without you guys excluding us from your catalog.”

McKenna’s letter didn’t just spark a public outcry and lead the corporate giant’s chief to apologize — it highlighted an unavoidable tension of the sporting goods industry: Girls and young women are one of its fastest-growing markets, and one of its most ignored.

Big shoes now empty: Girls basketball: Shabazz coach Vanessa Watson retires after 31 seasons

Vanessa Watson is truly going out on top.

After 720 career victories and six Tournament of Champions titles, including one in each of the last two seasons, Watson has retired from coaching girls basketball at Shabazz.

Watson finished her career with a 720-107 record, and she trailed only Pascack Valley’s Jeff Jasper 923 wins on the all-time list for New Jersey coaches. Watson led Shabazz to 10 state championships and six Tournament of Champions titles.

After 31 seasons on the bench at the Newark school, a combination of several things went into Watson’s decision to call 2013-14 her last season. 

It’s that amazing combination that can happen in sports: heart-breaking and heartwarming: Dying Mt. St. Joe’s player’s last game sells out

Read Full Post »

From the News & Observer’s Jane Stancill: Wainstein report says Jan Boxill, UNC faculty member, suggested grades for athletes in ‘paper’ classes

In one email exchange Wainstein uncovered, Deborah Crowder, the department secretary and mastermind of the scheme to set up the no-show classes, responded when Boxill forwarded a paper for a women’s basketball player in 2008.

“Did you say a D will do for (the basketball player)?” Crowder wrote to Boxill. “I’m only asking because 1. no sources, 2, it has absolutely nothing to do with the assignments for that class and 3. it seems to be a recycled paper. She took (another class) in spring of 2007 and that was likely for that class.”

According to the report, Boxill replied: “Yes, a D will be fine; that’s all she needs. I didn’t look at the paper but figured it was a recycled one as well, but I couldn’t figure out from where.”

This is the kind of news that really pisses off those of us who are trying to balance our love of education with our love of sports.

Read Full Post »

From Mechelle:

Was Laimbeer really given enough time in New York to replenish the roster and establish a playing identity that would hold up over the course of a season? I don’t think so, but maybe time wasn’t going to make a lot of difference. Perhaps the style that worked for Laimbeer in Detroit just isn’t viable now.

Or … maybe the Liberty needed to stay the course longer with Laimbeer and get help through a key free-agent signing or two, along with the talent-rich 2016 draft. It’s not as if any realistic projection of the 2015 Liberty — regardless of who was coaching — included title hopes.

From Mel, a little history lesson: Guru’s WNBA Musings: Another Blindside Hits the New York Liberty

Several WNBA types who were in Turkey for the recent world championship won by the pro stars of America under the USA Basketball banner had no idea, especially with front office executive Kristin Bernet among them.

When asked about Big Bad Bill’s whereabouts, she said he was fishing, which was not out of line from comments he made during his past two seasons.

Gotta say, I might have suggested the Lib should have secured my season ticket renewal before the move…

Speaking of ex-Libs: Hammon elected to Colorado Sports Hall of Fame Class of 2015

And other ex-Libs: Sun Devil WBB to Honor No. 32 Jersey of Hall of Famer Kym Hampton on Dec. 6

Hampton was the first ASU women’s basketball player to earn all-America honors (1981-1982). In addition to the aforementioned career scoring and rebounding records, Hampton set several other records, many of which still stand today, including: most career blocks (178), most points (683) and rebounds (413) in a season and most points (44), rebounds (28) and field goals (19 – tied) in a single game.

Read Full Post »

Bill Laimbeer let go by New York Liberty.

Why do I feel like this:

Gary-Larson-Aquarium-Fire

Read Full Post »

’cause if they did, I’m guessing this wouldn’t have happened: Parents angered after daughters’ Tennessee track careers come to abrupt end.

Morgan Harvey was among the six women Alford-Sullivan cut from the UT track team last month.

The dismissals occurred two weeks into practices, less than two months after the coach publicly praised the freshmen she inherited from Clark.

Parents heard the news the same way. Crying daughters called and told them they were no longer on the team.

These parents are now questioning Alford-Sullivan’s decision, her timing and her integrity.

How long before the sports commentator jump all over this?

Read Full Post »

we remember those who will not join us.

Vic Dorr Jr. from the. Richmond Times-Dispatch: University of Richmond women’s basketball team moves forward with heartache as constant companion

The pain they felt when it happened — shock, anguish, suffocating grief — was largely visceral. Temporary remedies were abundant: tears, hugs, the snug harbor offered by family and friends.

The pain they feel today is to a great extent cerebral. There are few, if any, effective remedies.

Lauren Sage Reinlie at the Daily News: Spirit lives on: Community gathers to remember beloved basketball coach

With hundreds of people gathered in the auditorium, Coach Patrick Harrington’s voice rang out again.

In a video playing on a large screen, the man stood on the sidelines of the basketball court, talking about his players and how he wanted to give them a chance to know what great opportunities they have to grow and change their lives.

From South Bend: Expectations still high for youthful Irish women’s basketball team

It’s been a few years since Muffet McGraw first put a whistle around her neck and stepped on a court in a dimly-lit gymnasium not far from the Main Line in suburban Philadelphia, to begin her first practice as a basketball coach.

And while it’s true Archbishop Carroll High School is a far cry from the bright lights of the University of Notre Dame’s Purcell Pavilion and college basketball’s biggest stage at the NCAA Final Four, don’t think for one second that the Fighting Irish Hall of Fame head coach isn’t excited about the start of another season.

Nice turn around in Austin: Women’s Basketball picked as preseason favorite to win the Big 12

From Spokane: Gonzaga women’s basketball rookie coach Lisa Fortier ushers in new era

The Gonzaga women’s basketball team opened practice Tuesday with a new head coach for the first time in 14 years and without a clear picture of the guard rotation for at least three years.

Out of Columbia: For USC women’s basketball, a national championship is the only goal

It was only the first day of practice, but the members of South Carolina’s women’s basketball team were already thinking of the ultimate goal.

“Our goal is definitely nothing short of a national championship,” said senior forward Aleighsa Welch, a Goose Creek native. “I think we have to put that in our minds and keep repeating to ourselves that we don’t want to settle for anything less than that. So that’s the main goal. That’s what we know we can accomplish this year. But it all starts right here.”

From their competition down the road: Lady Vols say they’re heeding Warlick’s message

Tennessee guard Ariel Massengale says the Lady Vols are listening more closely to coach Holly Warlick this season.

 The Lady Vols are hoping that extra attention helps them earn the Final Four bid that has eluded them since their 2008 national championship season. Tennessee opened practice Monday with most of the nucleus back from a team that went 29-6 and reached a regional semifinal last season.

From Notre Dame: Irish Women’s Basketball Tips Off 2014-15 Preseason,

It’s been a few years since Muffet McGraw first put a whistle around her neck and stepped on a court in a dimly-lit gymnasium not far from the Main Line in suburban Philadelphia, to begin her first practice as a basketball coach. And while it’s true Archbishop Carroll High School is a far cry from the bright lights of the University of Notre Dame’s Purcell Pavilion and college basketball’s biggest stage at the NCAA Final Four, don’t think for one second that the Fighting Irish Hall of Fame head coach isn’t excited about the start of another season.

From Jim Fuller at the Citizen Register: UConn’s Moriah Jefferson has chance to step into leadership role

The casual onlooker may wonder how the UConn women’s basketball team plans to replace the production of graduated All-Americans Stefanie Dolson and Bria Hartley.

While it will be no easy task replacing what Dolson and Hartley brought on the court, the bigger issue facing the two-time defending national champions could be who fills the rather sizeable hole in the leadership department.

Big things are expected from seniors Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis and Kiah Stokes, but the reality is that they are more of the lead-by-example types. Certainly reigning national player of the year Breanna Stewart will be a leader just based on her incredible skill set and list of accomplishments. But junior point guard Moriah Jefferson could be the most likely candidate to become the Huskies’ unquestioned leader.

UConn’s Dailey thankful for World Championship experience

Two days ago Geno Auriemma and Chris Dailey were in Istanbul, Turkey as the United States team, featuring five current or former UConn players, won the FIBA World Championship for Women.

After a long day of travel, the UConn head coach and associate head coach were back on campus and back at work. Auriemma looked absolutely spent and considering how he graciously gave me more than 15 minutes of his time when I was up at UConn for a football press conference before diving head long into his national team responsibilities, I resisted the temptation to corner him for an interview. However, when Dailey walked by me earlier today, I was able to spend a couple of minutes with her so she could reflect on her time as an advance scout for the gold-medal winning U.S. team.

Lady Raiders search for Rowe’s replacement

It’s been only a week of practice for the MTSU women’s basketball team, so it’s no surprise coach Rick Insell has more of his own questions than he has answers.

At this point, the 10th-year coach is simply emphasizing “repetition, repetition, repetition.”

“We gotta keep doing what we’re doing right here in practice,” he said. “Make them work harder.”

He added, “We’re not too bad. I’m not happy with where we’re at, but I don’t need to be happy right now. I need to be happy, in January.

“We’ll get there.”

Out of Lincoln: NU women’s basketball notebook: Huskers begin to try to replace Hooper

“Right now the elephant — the big things — are a little scary,” Yori said Wednesday. “Can we score on a consistent basis, and can we get defensive rebounds? Those are scary, because you think, who did we lose? We lost one of the best scorers of all time in the history of this program, and one of the best defensive rebounders of all time. Those are big things. Those are areas right now where we’re not very good.”

From Oregon: OSU women’s basketball: Beavers focused as practice begins

Over the first three days of practice, there was a focus unlike anything previously seen for Scott Rueck’s Oregon State women’s basketball program.

It makes sense as the Beavers return a plethora of talent that contributed immensely to one of the best seasons in program history.

Tough news for the Buckeyes: Ohio State women’s basketball: Makayla Waterman out indefinitely, facing knee surgery

Similar bad news in Colorado: CU women’s basketball: Buffs kick off practices without Roberson

Throughout the offseason, Arielle Roberson felt as healthy as ever and went through workouts determined to lead the Colorado women’s basketball to a great season.

On Tuesday afternoon, she sat in the Coors Events Center seats with crutches nearby as she watched her teammates go through their first official practice of the 2014-15 campaign.

“It just really sucks,” the junior forward said.

Cappie’s off to Australia: WNBA star signed to replace import Monica Wright, who is also injured

The loss of star recruit Elizabeth Cambage to a season-ending Achilles tendon injury and the failure of import Monica Wright to recover from what was seemingly minor knee surgery forced Dandenong to send out an SOS less than two weeks before the start of the 2014/15 WNBL season.

And it was answered on Thursday by WNBA superstar Cappie Pondexter, who signed a one-year deal to join the Rangers. The 31-year-old American guard is expected to be in uniform for the season-opener on October 18.

From Jonothan Lintner at USA Today: Native American community recognizes Shoni Schimmel

Shoni Schimmel often recognizes her Native American following, signing autographs and taking pictures after games with those who travel to see the University of Louisville graduate who grew up on an Umatilla reservation in Oregon.

This week, it was Schimmel who was recognized for her prominence as a 2014 Native American “40 under 40” award recipient.

From  at The Wrap:  WNBA Star Brittney Griner Talks About Becoming First Openly Gay Athlete Endorsed by Nike

Suivez-la Swoopes: Sheryl Swoopes’ son commits to Texas Tech

From Stephanie Kowalsky at the starsnews.com, timely but tough news: Ruthie Bolton: Ex-WNBA Star Victim of Domestic Violence; “It’s a Very Lonely Place to Be”

Breaking down in tears in front of a packed room, Bolton admitted in public for the first time that her ex-husband was abusive and that she used to live every day in fear of what he may do to her.

“I was living in an abusive marriage,” Bolton said, according to ESPN. “I could do whatever I wanted on the basketball court, I could defend an opponent, or hit a big shot, but I couldn’t get a grasp on my personal life.”

Out of Chicago: She didn’t play a minute, but Jersey City college student a star for WNBA team

“I was just scared to talk to people,” said Ortega, 21, who was born in Hoboken, but lived all her life in Jersey City with her family. “I thought my thoughts were either stupid or weren’t worth saying, so I just kept most of it to myself.”

Fast-forward to her final year at Centenary College in Hackettstown, and Ortega is the president of its Sports Management Association, is a mentor to freshmen students, and most of all, had finished a summer internship with the WNBA team Chicago Sky, where she was ranked No. 1 out of 8 interns in sales.

From Fast Company: Will the Future of Sports Reporting Include Sports Reporters? 

Dano first approached the men’s major leagues, but didn’t get anywhere. “There was interest, but the bigger leagues are a bit more cautious and guarded with how they adopt things,” he says. So he decided to focus on the WNBA, a league that could benefit more from the publicity. “The WNBA was really receptive,” says Dano. “Once we broke that ice, that validated things. We had one good partner, and they talked to their colleagues in the other leagues.” There are now about 40 WNBA players using the service, the most from any league. “Just about every player idea that we’ve gone to SportsBlog with, they’ve accepted and helped out with,” says WNBA Players Association director of operations, Pam Wheeler.

Out of the NCAA: June Courteau named coordinator of women’s basketball officiating

June Courteau has been named the NCAA’s national coordinator of women’s basketball officiating, bringing more than 45 years of officiating experience to the position.

“I have had the unique opportunity to work closely and learn from the last three national coordinators and am thrilled to be provided this great opportunity,” said Courteau. “Maintaining the momentum created by Anucha Browne at the national office on both the rules and officiating fronts is job one. The stakeholders in our game, including the rules committee, coaches, coordinators of officials and the officials themselves must continue to be heard and have buy-in towards these decisions. We continue to strive for a free flowing and up-tempo game.”

WATN? Lafayette women’s basketball staff adds Hall of Famer Theresa Grentz, former U.S. Olympic coach

“Passion, charisma, expertise and integrity are just a few adjectives describing coach Grentz,” Leopards head coach Dianne Nolan said in a news release. “I am very excited for our players, staff and the Lafayette community to interact with coach Grentz, as she shares her wealth of knowledge and experience.”

BTW: NBA Announces Major 9-Year TV Deal With ESPN, ABC, TNT: WNBA And NBA D-League Get New Contracts

Read Full Post »

Simmons cleared to play at Seton Hall

Read Full Post »

“Geez, Helen, you go all the way to Istanbul and you don’t make it to Topkapi Palace??!!”

To which I respond, “Of COURSE I did (albeit staggering a bit after post-gold medal game writing) and here’s the proof”:

DSC03252

DSC03258

DSC03262

 

DSC03267

DSC03271

Read Full Post »

Alabama now tells NCAA it will support waiver for former women’s basketball player Daisha Simmons

Alabama has changed its stance on former women’s basketball player Daisha Simmons.

Simmons left the school and transferred to Seton Hall University after graduating from Alabama. She had a release from Alabama to talk to other schools, but an original letter sent to the NCAA from Alabama did not support Simmons’ request to be immediately eligible.

But the stories still don’t quite mesh: Attorney for Daisha Simmons alleges Title IX violations, says Alabama knew family’s health problems

Read Full Post »

a litte US v. Spain recap via:

Yours truly and Lee: Women’s World Cup: USA sweeps to gold with 77-64 win over Spain 

The United States’ offense was at times elegant – as when Diana Taurasi (Phoenix Mercury) bulleted a court-long past to Seimone Augustus for one of her game-high assists – and at times muscular, as when Lindsay Whalen (Minnesota Lynx) ended the first quarter with a crowd-pleasing drive to the basket.

Women’s World Cup: Australia takes bronze in 74-44 rout of Turkish hosts

It was obvious that the Turkish team was disappointed and emotionally exhausted after their tournament run, but there was pride, too. “I’d like to congratulate the Australians on their win tonight,” said Turkish coach Ceyhun Yildizoglu. “They fought really hard to get this win, and it was a particularly powerful performance coming off their loss to the United States last night. For us it was just the opposite. We weren’t able to bounce back from the game last night (Turkey’s loss to Spain).”

Doug: Maya Moore leads U.S. to gold medal

Sue Bird added another gold medal to her already incredible U.S. basketball resume.

Bird became the most-decorated player in world championship history when the Americans won a second straight gold with a 77-64 victory over Spain on Sunday night.

Last year, Maya Moore “traveled” far into the future. The magic of professional make-up artists transformed her into “Betty Lou,” the old lady who shows she hasn’t lost her basketball mojo in a Pepsi Max commercial with similarly aged NBA players Kyrie Irving and Nate Robinson.

When Moore looked in the mirror and saw herself in artificial elderly form, her competitiveness came out.

“I hope I’m going to look better than that,” she said with a grin during this past WNBA season. “Both of my grandmothers are aging well, and my mom is, too. I’ve got some good genes.”

No one — least of all Team USA’s opponents at the FIBA World Championship for Women — will dispute that. The United States won the gold medal Sunday with a 77-64 victory over Spain, and Moore was named the tournament’s most valuable player.

Boti Nagy: Australia captain Penny Taylor named in All-Star Five after excellent World Championship form and Marianna Tolo stars as Opals hammer Turkey to secure third place at World Championships

 Brutal defensive pressure and brilliant offensive teamwork has won Australia a bronze medal at the FIBA Women’s World Championships after a 74-44 win over host nation Turkey.

Marianna Tolo led the assault with an Opals tournament-high of 21 points at 73 per cent, grabbing six rebounds and playing great defence in a complete performance which should secure avid WNBA interest for the France-based centre.

AAP: Opals finish in the medals at world championships

 The Australian women’s basketball team has saved it s best for last to win the bronze medal in style at the world championship.

The Opals, missing their two most influential players, completed an impressive campaign with a 30-point thumping of hosts Turkey in Sunday’s third-place playoff.

Today’s Zaman: Turkey loses bronze medal chance after Australia defeat

It’s been lovely to be in Istanbul and really fun to be in the arena for the World Championships. The praised heaped on the Turkish fans is well deserved.  I wish I could have seen more of the city, but that just means I can come back again. Until then, some final shots of the Blue Mosque.

DSC03195

DSC03199

DSC03203

DSC03251

Read Full Post »

Can’t WAIT for the Turkey – Australia game. I know the place will be rockin’.

And, a little something something to peruse before the Spain – U.S. game: U.S. defeats Australia, 82-70; Faces Spain for gold

…it’s odd to hear Frank Sinatra filling the Turkish streets… off to the Tram-Ferrry-Metro-Taxi-Arena!

Read Full Post »

and a little nerve-wracking.

Even with both teams missing important “bigs” (Cambage, Jackson, Fowles & Delle Donne) many thought the U.S. would cakewalk over the Australians. Obviously, the Opals didn’t get the message. Marianna Tolo help them execute their game plan beautifully – target BG, keep her out of the paint, and get her into foul trouble.

With Griner limited to 17 minutes and 6 points, the US offense had to re-discover what it was to play a half-court game, the defense had to step up, and Tina Charles had to release her inner beast. Fortunately for the Americans, all that happened and they moved into the gold-medal game with a less-comfortable than it looked 82-70 win.

They now face Spain, who overcame the fabulous Turkish crowd and a pesky Turkish team, 66-56.  For Turkey, both Lara Sanders (aka LaToya Pringle) and Nevriye Yilmaz were strong in the post, but the team simply didn’t have enough guard skill to pull out a win. Spain’s Sancho Lyttle was Yolanda Griffith-esque in the paint, and Alba Torrens (28pts, 6 rebounds, 3 assists) was... torrential and tormenting and terrific. I loved the moment in the fourth where she intercepted a pass, drove for the basket, and raced back on defense, giving her bench a screamed “Yeah!” on the way. Said Geno:

“Spain deserves to be in the championship game. They deserve to be there because they played well the whole tournament and because they beat the home team in front of a great crowd in a great game,” U.S. coach Geno Auriemma said. “They have earned their way to the game.”

Today’s game is on ESPN2, 2:15 EST. It will be an interesting match up, with both teams ranked in the the top 4 in FIBA’s points-fg%-rebounds-assists. Mechelle thinks Spain will be USA’s toughest test yet

So Sunday, the Spaniards will try to hand the United States its first loss in a world championship final game since the days when Cheryl Miller and Lynette Woodard were the Americans’ stars.

Of course, the Spaniards don’t need to hear about how history is against them Sunday, and likely don’t care, either. They can just look at the makeup of Team USA to know how difficult their task is, but it doesn’t diminish the fact that they are giddy with excitement about making the final for the first time in their nation’s history.

Said Maya:

I think we had some turnovers (the USA committed 19 turnovers and got just 2 steals, while Australia had 12 turnovers against 7 steals) that we didn’t have to. We want to do a better job of keeping them (their opponents) off the free-throw line. Just be a little smarter on defense. Just some communication errors, but those are all fixable.

On Spain:

They are great. They are a really passionate team. They’ve got talent at every position. They don’t quit. They’ve got some versatile post players. They can shoot the ball and pass the ball pretty well. We have to be disciplined in our job against them and make sure they don’t get anything extra.

I think two of the best teams are playing the Final. I think each team has proved that they are worthy of being in this game. It’s going to a game worthy of being the Final of a World Championship.

I’m looking forward to see how quickly Griner can translate the lessons of the Australian game onto the court.

While you’re waiting, check out game photos from thesixthwoman.

Read Full Post »

Alabama and coach Curry get some more unwelcome attention: Alabama AD Bill Battle and women’s basketball coach Kristy Curry are the “Worst Persons in the Sports World

Rob Dauster: Alabama’s treatment of former player Daisha Simmons is shameful

To recap: Alabama refused to release a student-athlete who completed her undergraduate degree because, after she wasn’t accepted into the MBA program that she wanted to enroll in, she decided to move back home to be with her brother, who is fighting a disease that could kill him, while taking those graduate courses.

It’s worth noting here that four of her teammates reportedly transferred out of the program and received releases. But they left because they weren’t good enough. In other words, they were run off.

Very nice, Alabama.

Wendy Parker (BlueStar) Another nasty transfer battle in women’s basketball

Compared to its male counterpart, the sport of women’s basketball does better embody the ideal NCAA ethos of classroom accomplishment and academic success. Not many bad APR headlines to worry about here either.

But when Daisha Simmons had to alter her post-graduate educational plans this spring, she was unwittingly pulled into one of the increasingly ugly recent developments at the top levels of the women’s game.

Drew Champlin (AL) offers some interesting details:  Former Alabama player Daisha Simmons wanted Alabama to do more after granting her release

While Simmons acknowledges that Alabama granted her release – in contradiction to many published reports – she contends the university could have done more to help her obtain a waiver.

“They sent a letter to the NCAA saying they don’t support my (immediate) eligibility,” Simmons said.

 

Read Full Post »

You had a feeling this would happen… and it did. U.S. 94, France 72.

Griner and Charles combined to make 14 of their 18 shots as the U.S. dominated the paint, outscoring France 62-24.

“That was the plan,” point guard Sue Bird said. “We wanted to get stops on the defensive end, run as fast as we could and then get the ball inside. We were able to generate really good shots and there are enough players on this team if you get them their looks that they’re probably going to make them. Everyone took their shot.”

Wrote Mechelle:

It’s hard enough to contend with the Americans when they’re having just an average shooting game. When they are hitting practically every shot they even think about, just forget it.
***

The thing was it wasn’t just the inside game that worked for the Americans on Friday. It was everything. This was one of those rare times when if you shot 50 percent, you were the least accurate player on the team.

The U.S. quickly and efficiently cut their way through the French and swept into the semi finals of the World Championship. Of course there are nits to pick (those threes, Gruda’s goodness) but really, that’s only because Geno and his crew need something to pick at during this mornings walkthrough.

From USA Basketball

Shooting a USA World Championship record 70.7 percent from the field (41-58 FGs), the 2014 USA Basketball Women’s World Championship Team (4-0) took control of the game early in its 94-72 win over France (3-2) and never looked back to advance to the semifinals of the 2014 FIBA World Championship on Friday night at Fenerbahce Arena in Istanbul, Turkey.

“When you come out and shoot the ball the way we shot it in the first half, it’s kind of difficult for the other team to kind of keep pace,” said USA head coach Geno Auriemma (University of Connecticut). “We just have so many good offensive players. They’re a very physical team and they’re a very good defensive team, and they rely on their defense to keep them in games. But, the way we started the game and the way Tina (Charles) and Brittney (Griner) kind of set the tone early on. We were able to get them established in the lane. Then we just played off of that.

Next up for the US: the Australians, who entered the semi’s by defeating Canada 63-52. (Shout out to Mini Mi and her key threes)

“We expected a fight,” Australia coach Brendan Joyce said. “We weren’t surprised with that first quarter, we talked about the defensive end a bit, trying to reduce the scoring, the second quarter, things were going well, we tightened up a little bit.”

While I appreciate Sue Birds description of the Opals (“Even though they might not have Lauren Jackson and Elizabeth Cambage and whatever, they have an identity within themselves, and they really play to it.”), it’s hard to imagine the Aussies can give the US much of a match, especially with Griner and Charles hitting on all cylinders, but, stranger things have happened.

Of note, Australia hasn’t faced particularly stiff competition this tournament (CubaKorea, and Belarus), but they have used the games to regroup. We’ll see how well Marianna Tolo is prepared to step in for the missing bigs. Paulo Kennedy asks: Opals kick-starting something good?

While every team dreams of dethroning the undisputed queens of international basketball, few outfits hang with the USA for more than a half.

A big question for the Opals is how to approach the game?

Do they continue with the same aggressive approach and back their system? Or do they make adjustments to slow the game a little and take away some of the Americans’ strengths?

While some subtle adjustments are required in pool play, I’m a firm believer in sticking with what you’re best at, because doing something you’re not as good at is unlikely to deliver victory.

In the other semi, it will be Spain against the home crowd… and team, Turkey. For many, Spain has been the class of the opposition. It’s why Paul wonders, Can ‘basketball alchemist’ Mondelo work his magic?

The question of whether anybody can actually get anywhere toppling the all-conquering USA is a common one at any major tournament.

Traditionally, it has been Australia and Russia who have been the major challengers to their superiority, but now Spain look like they could assume the mantle of closest rivals.

After all, they have Lucas Mondeloat the helm – someone I am now labelling as a ‘basketball alchemist’ for his ability to produce success and primarily gold, for both club and country.

Put quite simply – I believe if anyone can, then Mondelo can.

Of course the play-caller is only one part of the Spanish asset-base, which looks to be magnificent at the moment.

It will be exciting to see them play in person. They handled China efficiently, 71-55, behind Sancho Lyttle’s 24 points and 7 rebounds. Really appreciate the Spanish press in attendance, btw.

The Turkey/Serbia game was a hoot to attend — though my ears are still ringing. The crowd was loud (I mean REALLY loud) and enthusiastic – living and dying with every basket. It was a back-and-forth game with UNC grad Latoya Pringle (Now Lara Sanders) putting on a gutty, fierce show. In the end, clutch free throws and some smooth shooting from Turkey’s “other” big, Nevriye Yilmazi, gave them the 62-61 victory.

There were scenes of jubilation for Turkey after overturning a double digit deficit to beat Serbia 62-61 in dramatic fashion and reach the Semi-Finals of the FIBA World Championship for Women.

Flat and uninspiring at both ends of the court when trailing 36-26, it had looked like the dreams of the host nation were in serious danger of being shattered.

But a remarkable turnaround ensured – no better highlighted by veteran legend Nevriye Yilmaz, who had been an eye-watering 0 of 14, but made her next three shots in a row to play a part in the revival.

“I am so happy with this victory and to beat a tough team like Serbia,” said Yilmaz afterwards.

It’s kinda nice to know that the refs are “on our side” when we play internationally: World Cup: Canada, France, Serbia, China make quarters; losers blame America

BTW: PHOTOS: Check out thesixthwoman’s tumblr for some sweet game photographs.

While we wait for tonight (and perhaps nap to stave off this wanna be cold) a little more of scenic Turkey, this time the Hagia Sophia:

DSC03110

DSC03113

DSC03128

DSC03130

DSC03181

DSC03124

Read Full Post »

As the United States moves out of pool play unscathed (3-0) and prepares for their must-win matchup against France in Thursday night’s quarterfinal round of the 2014 FIBA World Basketball Championship for Women, the memory of their exhibition loss against Les Bleues in Paris 11-days ago lingers.

“We didn’t play like we wanted to play,” said Angel McCoughtry (Atlanta Dream). “We were sluggish, even a bit lazy.”

“They played really well and we didn’t,” echoed Maya Moore (Minnesota Lynx). “We didn’t play with the level of focus and energy that was required to beat them on their home court. Losing a game is going to open your eyes,” Moore continued. “For us, we don’t want to be reminded of those lessons by taking a loss. But it happened. And we’re going to make the most of it by taking those feelings and motivation into tomorrow’s game.”

Read Full Post »

at the moment.)

Until then, some of the sights:

IMG_0170

Easy Rider:

IMG_0171

Fresh pressed pomegranate, anyone?

IMG_0218

 

IMG_0219

Yes, I know it’s cliché, but I don’t care. I bought a rug.

IMG_0165

 

Live and learn: I’m staying in Sultanahmet – the Old City on the European side Istanbul. The World Championship is held on the Asian side of Istanbul. So, to get there yesterday took several steps. Literally and figuratively.

First I walked past the Blue Mosque…

IMG_0213
and the Hagia Sophia…

IMG_0217

and then a beautiful water source…

IMG_0203

 

IMG_0204

IMG_0205

Then I took the tram from Cemberlitaş to Eminönü.

IMG_0172

I then crossed the street to the Kadıköy ferry dock.

IMG_0177

I then took the ferry to Karaköy.

IMG_0183

IMG_0191

IMG_0198

IMG_0201Then I took a taxi to the Ülker Sports Arena, where Angel plays for Fenerbahçe.

3BEE6722-635F-473F-8352-6812B5C3F07Aflexible

I got to watch a little of the U.S. practice – always a joy. Always an education. Then I got a few moments with Angel, Maya and coach Auriemma. Hopefully a piece in anticipation of tonight’s game will be put a Fullcourt (time differences make things intriguing), but a snippet, un-game related:

Though his focus in on the upcoming game, Auriemma took a moment to reflect on sharing this tournament with his former player from Connecticut, Sue Bird (Seattle Storm), the only U.S player to compete in four World Championships.

“I don’t want to speak for her, but chances are this is her last World Championship,” said Auriemma. “She’s been incredibly consistent, she’s been a great leader through all this. She’s someone that everyone on the team respects. And when she left college, I wasn’t thinking, ‘Wow, I’m going to get a chance to coach her for another eight-year period.’ That’s just too unrealistic.

But to be put back in that space – to be back in that time – and to see how good she was…. What people sometimes forget about Sue was that she was always great in the absolute biggest games. Like, in her senior year, the whole season she was just moving along, keeping everybody in the right place at the right time, and then, in the NCAA tournament, boom! She has the ability to raise the level of her game to meet the occasion.

 So, whether it’s this year or in the Olympics, I am going to savor the minutes because I think she’s a once in a lifetime kind of player. I’m going to finish my coaching career feeling like the luckiest person because most people only get to coach a person for four years and here I got to coach her for eight years.”

For more about the balancing acts and the upcoming game, here’s Doug:

College players in Turkey focus on hoops, class

UConn star Breanna Stewart and freshman teammate Kia Nurse have had more than basketball to focus on at the women’s world championship. They also have to keep up with school work from nearly 5,000 miles away.

And  US women’s basketball team set to take on France

Maya Moore and her U.S. teammates know what’s at stake now. A loss and their world championship run would be over.

Standing in the way of another trip to the medal round is France, a team that handed the Americans a rare defeat on Sept. 21 in an exhibition game. The teams will meet again in the quarterfinals of the tournament Friday night.

And Mechelle: Why Team USA’s other MVP is key – Tina Charles leads U.S. women into quarters vs. France on Friday (ESPN3, 2:15 ET)

Maya Moore is the reigning WNBA MVP. Diana Taurasi was the WNBA Finals MVP. Sue Bird is playing in her record fourth FIBA World Championship. Breanna Stewart is trying to win a world championship gold medal before starting her quest for a third NCAA title. And then …

There’s that other U.S. national team player with UConn ties. You remember her, right? The 2012 WNBA MVP? Won a couple of NCAA championships in Storrs, Connecticut? Part of a major trade back in April?

We’re kidding, of course. Nobody has forgotten about New York Liberty center Tina Charles. But on a team where there are so many noteworthy stories, Charles can kind of blend into the woodwork, as it were. Or be taken for granted. That might be a better way to put it.

And here’s USA Basketball: USA Enters Medal Round At 2014 FIBA World Championship

After three decisive preliminary-round wins, the 2014 USA Basketball Women’s World Championship is on to the must-win medal round at the 2014 FIBA World Championship.

Interestingly, the USA, the No. 1 seed out of Group D, will meet at 9:15 p.m. (2:15 p.m. EDT, NBA TV and ESPN3/WatchESPN) on Oct. 3 the only team to which it has lost (76-72) thus far in 2014 – albeit in exhibition play – France (3-1), the No. 2 seed out of Group B and the winner of yesterday’s quarterfinal play-in game against Brazil.

About Les Bleus:

France advanced to the quarterfinals after winning its play-in game, 61-48 over Brazil. The team opened prelim- inary play with a narrow 50-48 loss to host Turkey, before closing out pool play with an 89-45 victory over Mozambique and a close 63-59 defeat of Canada.

In France’s four games in Turkey, the team has been led by forward Sandrine Gruda (15.0 ppg., 8.0 rpg.) and guard Celine Dumerc (5.8 ppg., 5.6 apg.), both of whom also suited up for France in the 2012 Olympics.

Read Full Post »

this sounds like a hot “denial of transfer” mess (with echoes of a more recent fiasco): Full timeline of Daisha Simmons’ request to transfer from Alabama to Seton Hall

From Asbury Park Press: Alabama called “spiteful” in block of Simmons transfer

Although they may threaten and delay and even impose conditions, college sports teams rarely block someone from transferring to play elsewhere.

Rarer still — virtually unheard of — is a college blocking a transfer who already has a degree.

The case of Daisha Simmons, then, is like Halley’s comet.

More from Swish Appeal: The sad story of Daisha Simmons’ fight to transfer from Alabama to Seton Hall

As reported by multiple outlets during the NCAA offseason, Alabama has taken a hard-line stance in blocking senior Daisha Simmons from transferring to Seton Hall for family reasons. ESPN college basketball analyst Jay Bilas said in an interview with Swish Appeal that the NCAA has done the right thing in response to the blocked transfer request, but Alabama is “acting in a shameful fashion”.

In happier news: Dolson Gives Her Take on the U.S. Women’s National Team

First off, my time with U.S. Women’s National Team was a great experience. It was an honor just to be selected for training camp and then to make it past the first cut and to go with the team to France is something I am very proud of. I came in with confidence and I think that helped me throughout camp and ultimately helped me be in the final 15.

One of the biggest takeaways for me was that I was honored to be around women like Diana Taurasi, Maya Moore and Seimone Augustus (among others). It truly was great to see how they carried themselves. I saw how hard they went in practice. I saw how motivated they were to do everything perfect — even down to streching. I even saw how they handled themselves off the court. When we were not practicing and there was some down time, nobody had headphones on or was in their own world. Everybody was talking and professional. I respected that. It was a learning opportunity for myself and it’s something I can use to my advantage in the future.

The Times-Picayune catches up with Pokey Chatman of Ama, still shining with Women’s National Basketball Association

A little “better late than never” from espnW: HEY FIBA, LET QATARI WOMEN PLAY

The best argument you can make against sports boycotts is that those who show up usually make history. Not those who stay away.

Think of Jesse Owens at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. Think of John Carlos and Tommie Smith’s Black Power salute at the 1968 Mexico City Games or baseball’s Jackie Robinson. Think of Kathrine Switzer sprinting to elude the race official who was trying to stop her from competing in the 1967 Boston Marathon or Venus Williams taking the microphone after winning the 2009 Dubai Tennis Championships and lamenting the absence of Shahar Pe’er, the Israeli woman who was banned by organizers and denied a visa to enter the Arabic country.

But sometimes refusing to play can actually be the right thing to do.

Read Full Post »